News ID: 115766
Published: 1002 GMT April 16, 2015

Report says ISIL terrorist group has a base near US

Report says ISIL terrorist group has a base near US

The ISIL terrorist group, wreaking havoc in Iraq and Syria, is operating with its own base just a few miles from the US southern state of Texas on the Mexican side of the border, according to a report.

The Judicial Watch reported that ISIL is working with drug cartels in Mexico, who are aiding the notorious group to smuggle terrorists inside American territory.

The report cited unnamed Mexican federal officials, including a high-ranking army officer, as disclosing the locations of two bases being used by the ISIL terrorists.

One of the bases, according to the Judicial Watch, is in a town only 8 miles away from the United States.

Mexican officials have disclosed that smugglers working with drug lords known as ”coyotes” are helping smuggle terrorists between Fort Hancock, Texas, and other locations inside the US which are yet to be disclosed, the report said.

So far, US government authorities have not commented on the alarming report, nor have they responded to a number of inquiries by activists and the media.

However, federal border security agencies in Texas working near the Mexican side dismissed the report, saying that “it’s unverified, and it is unlikely that ISIL is in Anapra or Juarez, Mexico.”

The ISIL terrorist group which is reportedly being supported by some US allies in the Middle East seven thousand miles away from Texas, has been operating in countries like Iraq and Syria, killing thousands of people and displacing millions more. 

The group has, as recently as last month, warned the West, including Europe of imminent attacks on their soils as part of a wider campaign to establish a “caliphate” that stretches from the Middle East to the heart of Europe.

It has also killed Westerners in the past months including American nationals.

   
KeyWords
 
Comments
Comment
Name:
Email:
Comment:
Security Key:
Captcha refresh
Page Generated in 0/1701 sec