News ID: 121143
Published: 0228 GMT June 29, 2015

Iran's agriculture sector uses 92% of water resources

Iran's agriculture sector uses 92% of water resources

Renewable water resources have declined in the past century in Iran in view of population growth, urbanization, the development of agriculture and industry as well as climatic conditions.

According to Iran's Energy Ministry, per capita renewable water resources declined from 13,000 cubic meters in 1921 to 1,400 cubic meters in 2014.

The situation is expected to worsen in the near future if the current trend prevails.

Iran is among the countries which are expected to face water scarcity by 2025.

In low- and middle-income countries, agriculture and industrial sectors use 80 percent and 10 percent of water resources, respectively.

However, in rich countries, as much as 60 percent of total water is used for farming and 30 percent for industrial purposes.

The remaining 10 percent is used for drinking.

In Iran, 92 percent of the total water resources are consumed for irrigating farmlands.

Industries account for two percent of water consumed nationwide, while six percent is used for drinking.

The daily per capita drinking water consumption (for households, industrial units and green spaces) is 204 liters, which is higher than that used in Spain (200 liters), Portugal (194 liters), Greece (175 liters), Sweden (164 liters), Denmark (159 liters), Britain (153 liters) Austria (153 liters), Ireland (142 liters), France (139 liters) and Germany (129 liters).

Nonetheless, daily per capita drinking water consumption in Swiss, Finland, Italy, the US and Canada is 252, 213, 213, 259 and 326 liters respectively.

The Persian Gulf littoral states do not have renewable water resources. Their drinking water comes from desalination plants. These nations are among those with the highest rate of water consumption worldwide.

The daily per capita water consumption in Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar and the UAE is 1,058, 1,208, 1,414, 1,033 and 2,027 liters respectively.

The residents of Saudi Arabia use 2,542 liters of drinking water per day, which is the highest in the world.

Regional conflicts, tensions, high migration rates and social problems have given rise to water scarcity.

An efficient water management system is essential to tackle water scarcity. Besides, efforts should be made to prevent contamination of water, raise public awareness about water crisis and prioritize its consumption.

 

 

 

   
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