News ID: 125333
Published: 0228 GMT August 25, 2015

US congress opposition to JCPOA harms US interests: Ayatollah Hashemi

US congress opposition to JCPOA harms US interests: Ayatollah Hashemi

US Congress opposition to Joint Comprehensive Plan Of Action (JCPOA) harms US interests, Expediency Council Chairman Ayatollah Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani said on Tuesday.

Speaking to a gathering of religious scholars in Mashad, he noted that some US congressmen are afraid of Iran's scientific progress and the revolution's role for preventing the spread of terrorism, IRNA reported.
The official voiced hope for gradual removal of Iran's sanctions after the nuclear deal.
Resistance of nuclear negotiating team forced the US president to praise Iran's logical stance in negotiations, he noted.
Rafsanjani referred to the Supreme Leader Ayatollah Seyyed Ali Khamenei's decree for prohibition of production and use of nuclear weapons, adding that Iran's nuclear activities are quite peaceful.
US officials have confessed that sanctions have not been a useful tool to prevent Iran's progress, he noted.
The official said that Iran is keen to become a member of world nuclear club to produce nuclear power for peaceful purposes.
On July 14, Iran and the P5+1 countries finalized the text of the agreement, dubbed the JCPOA, in the Austrian city of Vienna.
Under the JCPOA, limits will be put on Iran’s nuclear activities in exchange for, among other things, the removal of all economic and financial bans against the Islamic Republic.
The UNSC on July 20 unanimously adopted a draft resolution turning the JCPOA into an international law. All 15 members of the UN body voted for the draft UN resolution in New York, setting the stage for the lifting of the Security Council sanctions against Iran.
Ayatollah Rafsanjani's comments coincide with growing momentum among Democrats in favor of the agreement, struck by Iran and six world powers in July, despite a couple of high-profile defections.
Congress is poised to vote on a resolution in September that could disapprove of the P5+1 agreement.
Republicans, who control both chambers of Congress, are almost uniformly opposed to the deal and expect to garner enough votes to pass the resolution of disapproval.
But they would need at least 13 Democrats in the Senate and 44 Democrats in the House to join them in order to override a presidential veto, and Obama has declared in no uncertain terms that he will employ his veto pen against any attempts to kill the landmark deal.
Just 12 of the House’s 188 Democrats have publicly rejected the deal, largely placing attention on the Senate.

   
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