News ID: 171255
Published: 1058 GMT October 31, 2016

Lebanon set to elect president after two-year stalemate

Lebanon set to elect president after two-year stalemate

Lebanon’s former army commander Michel Aoun, a strong Hezbollah ally, is expected to win parliamentary approval to fill the country’s long-vacant presidency.

The parliament will convene at noon (1000 GMT) Monday for the 46th session to elect the president.

If Aoun fails to secure the two-thirds majority of 86 votes in the first round, he seems certain to prevail in a second, where he needs a 50-percent-plus-one majority of 65 votes in the 128-seat chamber.

The 81-year-old Christian leader has won the support of two of his greatest rivals: Samir Geagea, leader of the Christian Lebanese Forces, and ex-prime minister, Saad Hariri.

Earlier on October 20, Hariri, the leader Lebanon’s March 14 Alliance and a close ally of Saudi Arabia, voiced support for Aoun, raising hopes for the settlement of a long-running deadlock on Lebanon’s political stage.

He described his surprise endorsement of Aoun, a close ally of the Hezbollah resistance movement, as necessary to “protect Lebanon, protect the (political) system, protect the state and protect the Lebanese people.”

Observers view Aoun’s rise to power as a political victory for Hezbollah, which will greatly diminish the Saudi influence in Lebanon’s political arena. The kingdom has been vigorously lobbying to prevent Lebanon’s presidency from being placed in the hands of Hezbollah’s allies.

                              

Following Hariri’s announcement, Thamer al-Sabhan, a senior Saudi Foreign Ministry official, paid a visit to Beirut for talks on the “political developments in Lebanon and the region.”

Sabhan used to serve as the Saudi ambassador to Iraq, but Baghdad asked Riyadh in mid-October to replace him after the diplomat failed to heed Iraq’s warnings for his interference in the country’s domestic affairs.

Some Lebanese political sources said if Aoun was elected as president, Hariri would be appointed as prime minister for the second time.

Analysts say Aoun and Hariri, 46, face a formidable task to win the cross-party support needed to make a new administration a success.

Aoun, the founder of the Free Patriotic Movement, already has the endorsement Hezbollah.

Last week, Hezbollah Secretary General Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah called upon all Lebanese political parties to join forces and put a favorable end to the 30-month presidential void in the Arab country.

Nasrallah, who was speaking during a meeting with Aoun, stressed the need for concerted efforts in order to direct the upcoming presidential vote in Lebanon toward a good conclusion.

Lebanon has been without a head of state since 2014, when the term of President Michel Suleiman expired.

The Lebanese parliament has repeatedly failed to elect a president due to the lack of quorum.

Under Lebanon’s power-sharing system, the president must be a Christian, the prime minister a Sunni Muslim and the parliament speaker a Shia Muslim.

Hezbollah has accused Saudi Arabia of thwarting political initiatives and blocking the election of a president in Lebanon.

Late last year, Hariri launched an initiative to nominate Suleiman Tony Frangieh, the leader of the Marada Movement.

His proposal, however, failed amid reservations on the part of Lebanon’s main Christian parties as well as Hezbollah.

   
KeyWords
 
Resource: Presstv
Comments
Comment
Name:
Email:
Comment:
Security Key:
Captcha refresh
Page Generated in 0/1565 sec