The US may have withdrawn from the Paris climate change accord, but on Tuesday dozens of world leaders and philanthropists met to find solutions to the swiftly warming planet — and send a message of resolve to the White House.
France’s Macron takes lead in climate change battle
Golden eagles in North America may have the timing of their migration shifted out of step with a seasonal boom in food they need to raise their young, according to scientists.
Golden eagle migration out of sync with climate change
What does the child who can’t say goodbye to a parent without breaking down have in common with the child who is cripplingly terrified of dogs and the one who gets a bad stomach ache reliably on Monday morning?
Treating anxiety in children
Seventy-four percent of US parents help pay for their adult children’s living expenses, according to a new CreditCards.com and BankRate survey.
74% of parents help adult children with finances
Online social networking has revolutionized the way people communicate and interact with one another, despite idiosyncrasies we all love to hate — think top-10 lists of the most annoying people and habits on social media.
Life events shared on social media revive dormant connections
Anthropologists have debated for decades whether humans living in tribal communities thousands of years ago were more or less violent than societies today. Researchers at the University of Notre Dame wonder if the question of more or less violence is the wrong one —what if it's a matter of scale?
Violence a matter of scale, not quantity
Rice University scientists have found a way to make their asphalt-based sorbents better at capturing carbon dioxide from gas wells: Just add water.
Asphalt-based filter to sequester greenhouse gas at wellhead
The number of people who lost their lives in the western province of Kermanshah’s strong earthquake is still rising after one month.
Kermanshah quake death toll rises to 620
The second edition of China Education Fair 2017 concluded in Kathmandu on Sunday, with active participation of Nepali students aspiring to pursue higher studies at Chinese universities.
China Education Fair attracts Nepali students
People living in the former industrial heartlands of England and Wales are more disposed to negative emotions such as anxiety and depressive moods, more impulsive and more likely to struggle with planning and self-motivation, according to a new study of almost 400,000 personality tests.
Industrial Revolution left a damaging psychological 'imprint' on today's populations

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