Specks of calcium in the heart's artery walls could be an important prognostic marker of early cardiovascular disease in South Asians and may help guide treatment in this population, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.
Calcium specks may help detect heart disease in South Asians
A two-part study that examined both mice and humans revealed a strong link between inorganic phosphate, a food additive that is prevalent in the ‘Western diet’, and a lack of physical activity.
Does this common food additive stop us exercising?
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was associated with cardiovascular disease and cancer, as well as the metabolic syndrome, in a new study.
Does PTSD affect heart disease and cancer risk?
A new study by researchers at The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT finds that the protein CPG2 is significantly less abundant in the brains of people with bipolar disorder (BD) and shows how specific mutations in the SYNE1 gene that encodes the protein undermine its expression and its function in neurons.
Study shows how specific gene variants may raise bipolar disorder risk
A program that combines home modifications with specialized counseling may help seniors disabled by aging stay in their homes longer, a new study suggested.
Program helps seniors continue to live independently
Researchers at the he Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland have developed a new treatment for tuberculosis.
Researchers get closer to developing more reliable treatment for tuberculosis
While adding DNA sequencing to the screening of newborns for hundreds of potential genetic diseases may help accurately identify babies who will develop a disease, it could be too early to recommend for the general public, say researchers.
Could DNA screening test become norm to detect genetic diseases?
Amanda McKinlay used to burst into tears while brushing her hair, the small movements in her shoulder muscle causing unbearable agony.
Expert warns the UK could face its own US style opioid crisis
A survey of 61 psychiatric departments in 2017 shows that Norway’s health care system has difficulty helping patients with very serious self-harming behavior.
Norway struggles to help self-harming patients
Cardiovascular disease and stroke are the most common causes of death worldwide, resulting in hospitalization, disability and loss of income. For example, one-third of heart attacks, 25 percent of strokes and 40 percent of cardiac arrests occur in people of working age under age 65.
Cardiac events, stroke lead to loss of work, reduced income

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